Jun 25, 2022  
2021-2022 Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM194 HM - Chemistry of Modern Materials


    Credit(s): 2

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: A survey of the chemistry, synthesis and physical properties,of modern materials which include, but not limited to: polymers, glasses and ceramics, alloys and composites, semiconductors and related materials, advanced materials for energy storage, membranes, optical and photonic materials, biomedical materials, nanomaterials.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM051 HM CHEM056 HM , and PHYS051 HM   
  
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    CHEM195 HM - Physics and Chemistry of Stuff


    Credit(s): 2

    Instructor(s): Van Hecke, Eckert

    Description: A survey of techniques important for laboratory science in chemistry and physics including but not limited to: Vacuum pumps and vacuum systems; pressure measurement; temperature measurement; handling high pressure gases; safe material handling; safety data sheets; thermal baths and thermal control; metal, plastic, and rubber tubing; tools and their proper use. One meeting per week for the semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.
  
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    CHEM197 HM - Readings in Chemistry


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Special readings in chemistry. Open to juniors and seniors only. One to three credit hours per semester.

  
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    CHEM198 HM - Special Readings in Chemistry


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Special readings in chemistry. Open to juniors and seniors only. One to three credit hours per semester.

  
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    CHEM199 HM - Chemistry Seminar


    Credit(s): 0.5

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Presentations of contemporary research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists. Attendance by junior and senior majors is required. No more than 2.0 credits can be earned for departmental seminars/colloquia.

    Grading Type: Pass/No Credit


Computer Science

  
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    CSCI005 HM - Introduction to Computer Science


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Dodds, Kuenning, Medero

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Introduction to elements of computer science. Students learn computational problem-solving techniques and gain experience with the design, implementa­tion, testing, and documentation of programs in a high-level language. In addition, students learn to design digital devices, understand how computers operate, and learn to program in a small machine language. Students are also exposed to ideas in computability theory. The course also integrates societal and ethical issues related to computer science.

  
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    CSCI005GR HM - Introduction to Biology and Computer Science


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Wu, Bush (Biology)

    Offered: Fall

    Description: This course introduces fundamental concepts from the Core course CSCI005 HM  using biology as the context for those computational ideas. Students see both the intellectual and practical connections between these two disciplines and write computer programs to explore biological phenomena. Biology topics include the basics of bio­chemistry, the central dogma, population genetics, molecular evolution, metabolism, regulation, and phylogenetics. Computer science material includes basic data types and control structures, recursion, dynamic programming, and an introduction to automata and computability. This course fulfills the computer science Core requirement at Harvey Mudd College. It does not fulfill the Harvey Mudd biology Core requirement.

  
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    CSCI035 HM - Computer Science for Insight


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Dodds

    Description: This course extends CSCI005 HM  in developing software-composition skills. Pairing lectures and lab sessions, the experience will deepen foundations in algorithms and data structures, introduce machine learning and its mindset, weigh tradeoffs between human- and machine-efficiency, and build sophistication in software, both assembling existing software packages and from-scratch design. Students will deploy and assess computing projects of their own design – with substantive application beyond CS itself – as the course’s final capstone. The course continues in the language of CSCI005 HM  and especially encourages computing efforts which contribute to fields of interest beyond CS, whether academic or extracurricular.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI005 HM  or CSCI005GR HM  
  
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    CSCI042 HM - Principles and Practice of Computer Science


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Stone and Wiedermann

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Accelerated breadth-first introduction to computer science as a discipline for students (usually first-year) who have a strong programming background. Computational models of functional, object-oriented, and logic programming. Data structures and algorithm analysis. Computer logic and architecture. Grammars and parsing. Regular expressions. Computability. Extensive practice constructing applications from principles, using a variety of languages. Successful completion of this course satisfies the CSCI005 HM  Core requirement and CSCI060 HM  coursework.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
  
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    CSCI060 HM - Principles of Computer Science


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Boerkoel, Breeden, Dodds, Stone, Trushkowsky

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Introduction to principles of computer science: Information structures, functional programming, object-oriented programming, grammars, logic, logic programming, correctness, algorithms, complexity analysis, finite-state machines, basic processor architecture and theoretical limitations. Those who have completed CSCI042 HM  cannot take CSCI060 HM.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI005 HM  or CSCI005GR HM  
  
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    CSCI070 HM - Data Structures and Program Development


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bang, Breeden, Medero, O’Neill, Stone, Talvitie, Trushkowsky, Wiedermann

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Abstract data types including priority queues and dynamic dictionaries and efficient data structures for these data types, including heaps, self-balancing trees, and hash tables. Analysis of data structures including worst-case, average-case and amortized analysis. Storage allocation and reclamation. Secondary storage considerations. Extensive practice building programs for a variety of applications.

    Prerequisite(s): (CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM ), and at least one mathematics course at the level of calculus or higher; MATH055 HM  recommended
  
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    CSCI081 HM - Computability and Logic


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bang, Monta​ñez, Stone

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: An introduction to some of the mathematical foundations of computer science, particularly logic, automata, and computability theory. Develops skill in constructing and writing proofs, and demonstrates the applications of the aforementioned areas to problems of practical significance.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH055 HM  and (CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM )
  
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    CSCI105 HM - Computer Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Kuenning, Stone, Sweedyk, Trushkowsky

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: An introduction to computer systems. In particular, the course investigates data representations, machine level representations of programs, processor architecture, program optimizations, the memory hierarchy, exceptional control flow (exceptions, interrupts, processes and Unix signals), performance measurement, caches and virtual memory, system-level I/O, networking, and basic concurrent programming. These concepts are supported by a series of hands-on lab assignments.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM  
  
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    CSCI111 HM - Domain-Specific Languages


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Wiedermann

    Description: This course explores how to design a new programming language. In particular, we’ll focus on “Domain-Specific Languages”— languages designed for people who want to use a computer to perform a specialized task (e.g., to compose music or query a database or make games). Through readings, discussions, and programming, we’ll investigate why and how you would create a domain-specific language. The course also features a project that asks you to propose, design, and implement your own domain-specific language.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM  
  
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    CSCI121 HM - Software Development


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sweedyk, Wu

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Introduction to the discipline concerned with the design and implementation of software systems. The course presents a historical perspective on software development practice and explores modern, agile techniques for eliciting software requirements, designing and imple­menting software architecture and modules, robust testing practices, and project management. Student teams design, develop, and test a substantial software project.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM  
  
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    CSCI124 HM - Interaction Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Boerkoel

    Description: This course introduces students to issues in the design, implementation, and evalu­ation of human-computer interfaces, with emphasis on user-centered design and graphical interfaces. In this course, students learn skills that aid them in choosing the right user interaction technique and developing an interface that is well-suited to the people for whom it is designed.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI042 HM  or CSCI060 HM  
  
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    CSCI125 HM - Computer Networks


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Kuenning, Stone

    Description: Principles and analysis techniques for internetworking. Analysis of network­ing models and protocols. Presentation of computer communication with emphasis on protocol architecture.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI105 HM  
  
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    CSCI131 HM - Programming Languages


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bang, O’Neill, Stone, Wiedermann

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: A thorough examination of issues and features in language design and implementation including language-provided data structuring and data-typing, modularity, scoping, inheritance, and concurrency. Compilation and run-time issues. Introduction to formal semantics.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM  and CSCI081 HM  
  
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    CSCI132 HM - Compiler Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Stone

    Description: The design and implementation of compilers. Topics include elegant theoretical results underlying compilation techniques, practical issues in efficient implementation of program­ming languages, and bit-level interactions with operating systems and computer architec­tures. Over the course of the semester, students build a working compiler.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI105 HM  and CSCI131 HM  
  
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    CSCI133 HM - Database Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Trushkowsky

    Description: Fundamental models of databases: entity-relationship, relational, object-oriented. Relational algebra and calculus, query languages. Data storage, caching, indexing, and sorting. Locking protocols and other issues in concurrent and distributed data­bases.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM CSCI081 HM  recommended
  
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    CSCI134 HM - Operating Systems: Design and Implementation


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Kuenning, O’Neill, Stone, Staff

    Description: Design and implementation of operating systems, including processes, memory management, synchronization, scheduling, protection, file systems, and I/O. These concepts are used to illustrate wider concepts in the design of other large software systems, including simplicity; efficiency; event-driven programming; abstraction design; client-server architec­ture; mechanism vs. policy; orthogonality; naming and binding; static vs. dynamic, space vs. time, and other trade-offs; optimization; caching; and managing large code bases. Group projects provide experience in working with and extending a real operating system.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI105 HM  
  
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    CSCI137 HM - File Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Kuenning

    Description: Computer storage and file systems. Characteristics of nonvolatile storage, including magnetic disks and solid-state memories. RAID storage. Data structures used in file systems. Performance, reliability, privacy, replication, and backup. A major portion of the course is devoted to readings selected from current research in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI105 HM  
  
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    CSCI140 HM - Algorithms


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Boerkoel, Monta​ñez, Schofield, Stone, Pippenger (Mathematics)

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Algorithm design, analysis, and correctness. Design techniques including divide-and-conquer and dynamic programming. Analysis techniques including solutions to recurrence relations and amortization. Correctness techniques including invariants and inductive proofs. Applications including sorting and searching, graph theoretic problems such as shortest path and network flow, and topics selected from arithmetic circuits, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, and oth­ers. An introduction to computational complexity, NP-completeness, and approximation algorithms. Proficiency with programming is expected as some assignments require algorithm implementation. (Crosslisted as MATH168 HM )

    Prerequisite(s): ((CSCI070 HM  and CSCI081 HM ) or ((CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM ) and MATH131 HM ))
  
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    CSCI142 HM - Complexity Theory


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Pippenger (Mathematics)

    Description: Brief review of computability theory through Rice’s Theorem and the Recursion Theorem followed by a rigorous treatment of complexity theory. The complexity classes P, NP, and the Cook-Levin Theorem. Approximability of NP-complete problems. The polynomial hierarchy, PSPACE-completeness, L and NL-completeness, #P-completeness. IP and Zero-knowledge proofs. Randomized and parallel complexity classes. The speedup, hierarchy, and gap theorems. (Crosslisted as MATH167 HM )

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI081 HM  
  
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    CSCI144 HM - Scientific Computing


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bernoff (Mathematics), de Pillis (Mathematics), Yong (Mathematics)

    Description: Computational techniques applied to problems in the sciences and engineering. Modeling of physical problems, computer implementation, analysis of results; use of mathematical software; numerical methods chosen from: solutions of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, finite elements, linear programming, optimization algorithms, and fast Fourier transforms. (Crosslisted as MATH164 HM )

    Prerequisite(s): MATH073 HM MATH082 HM , and (CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM 
  
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    CSCI145 HM - Advanced Topics in Algorithms


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: The objective of this course is to explore sophisticated algorithm design and analysis techniques that are generally not taught in a first algorithms course. The course addresses topics such as graph matching, competitive analysis of online algorithms, matroid theory, and approximation algorithms and schemes.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI140 HM  or MATH168 HM  
  
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    CSCI151 HM - Artificial Intelligence


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Boerkoel, Talvitie, Wu

    Description: This course presents a general introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence. It examines the question: What does (will) it take for computers to perform human tasks? It presents a broad introduction to topics such as knowledge representation, search, learning and reasoning under uncertainty. For each topic, it examines real-world applications of core techniques to problems which may include game playing, text classification and visual pattern recognition.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM  and (MATH062 HM  or BIOL154 HM 
  
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    CSCI152 HM - Neural Networks


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sweedyk

    Description: Modeling, simulation, and analysis of artificial neural networks and their relation to biological networks. Design and optimization of discrete and continuous neural networks. Back propagation and other gradient descent methods. Hopfield and Boltzmann networks. Unsupervised learning. Self-organizing feature maps. Applications chosen from function approximation, signal processing, control, computer graphics, pattern recognition, time-series analysis. Relationship to fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, and artificial life.

    Prerequisite(s): (CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM ) and MATH073 HM  and (MATH062 HM  or BIOL154 HM )
  
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    CSCI153 HM - Computer Vision


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: Computational algorithms for visual perception. Students will develop applications that acquire, process and interpret still images and image streams. The course will cover representations of color, shading, texture and shape along with stereo and motion analysis, object recognition and approaches for three-dimensional representation. Applications include robotics, human perception and the use of large image databases.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI060 HM  or CSCI042 HM  
  
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    CSCI155 HM - Computer Graphics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Breeden, Sweedyk

    Description: This course is an introduction to the major concepts in modern computer graphics. Students will become familiar with the technical challenges posed by the capture, display, and generation of digital images. Important concepts such as the role of specialized hardware, trade-offs in physical realism and rendering time, and the critical reading and analysis of graphics literature will be introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM MATH073 HM , and (MATH062 HM  or BIOL154 HM )
  
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    CSCI158 HM - Machine Learning


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Wu

    Description: Machine learning is concerned with the study and development of systems that learn patterns in data. This course introduces the most common problems in the field and the techniques used to tackle these problems, with a focus on supervised and unsupervised learning. Concepts include mathematical foundations and algorithmic approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI070 HM MATH073 HM , and (MATH062 HM  or BIOL154 HM ); CSCI151 HM  recommended
  
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    CSCI159 HM - Natural Language Processing


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Medero, Schofield

    Description: An introduction to the fundamental concepts and ideas in natural language processing, sometimes called computational linguistics. The goals of the field range from text translation and understanding to enabling humans to converse with robots. We will study language processing starting from the word level to syntactic structure to the semantic meaning of text. Approaches include statistical as well as symbolic methods using logic and the lambda calculus. Students will build and modify systems and will use large existing corpora for validating their systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI081 HM  and (MATH062 HM  or BIOL154 HM )
  
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    CSCI181 HM - Computer Science Seminar


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Advanced topics of current interest in computer science.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
  
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    CSCI183 HM - Computer Science Clinic I


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall

    Description: The Clinic Program brings together teams of students to work on a research problem sponsored by business, industry, or government. Teams work closely with a faculty advisor and a liaison provided by the sponsoring organization to solve complex real-world problems. Students are expected to present their work orally and to produce a final report conforming to professional publication standards. CSCI183  HM and CSCI184 HM  must be taken consecutively to count toward the major.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI121 HM  and senior standing; or permission of the Computer Science Clinic director
  
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    CSCI184 HM - Computer Science Clinic II


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: The Clinic Program brings together teams of students to work on a research problem sponsored by business, industry, or government. Teams work closely with a faculty advisor and a liaison provided by the sponsoring organization to solve complex real-world problems. Students are expected to present their work orally and to produce a final report conforming to professional publication standards. CSCI183 HM  and CSCI184  HM must be taken consecutively to count toward the major.

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI121 HM CSCI183 HM , and senior standing; or permission of the Computer Science Clinic director
  
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    CSCI186 HM - Computer Science Research and Independent Study


    Credit(s): 0.5-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: A research or development project under computer science faculty supervision. No more than 3 units can count toward major elective credit.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
  
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    CSCI189 HM - Programming Practicum


    Credit(s): 1

    Instructor(s): Dodds, Stone, Sweedyk

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: This course is a weekly programming seminar, emphasizing efficient recognition of computational problems and their difficulty, developing and implementing algorithms to solve them, and the testing of those implementations. Attention is given to the effective use of programming tools and available libraries, as well as to the dynamics of team problem-solving. No more than 3 credits can count toward the major elective requirement.

    Repeatable: May be taken for major elective credit up to three times

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI005 HM  or CSCI005GR HM  or CSCI042 HM  
  
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    CSCI195 HM - Computer Science Colloquium


    Credit(s): 0.5

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Oral presentations and discussions of selected topics, including recent developments in computer science. Participants include computer science majors, Clinic participants, faculty members, and visiting speakers. No more than 2.0 credits can be earned for departmental seminars/col­loquia. All majors welcome.

    Grading Type: Pass/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s): Juniors and seniors only

Computer Science and Mathematics

  
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    CSMT181 HM - Special Topics in Computer Science and Mathematics


    Credit(s): 1.5-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: A course devoted to exploring topics of current interest. Topics announced prior to registration.

  
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    CSMT183 HM - Computer Science and Mathematics Clinic I


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Team project in joint computer science and mathematics, with corporate affiliation. CSMT183 HM and CSMT184 HM  must be taken consecutively to count toward the major.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing as a Joint CS/Math major, or permission of the Computer Science or Mathematics Clinic director.
  
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    CSMT184 HM - Computer Science and Mathematics Clinic II


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff.

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Team project in joint computer science and mathematics, with corporate affiliation. CSMT183 HM  and CSMT184  HM must be taken consecutively to count toward the major.

    Prerequisite(s): CSMT183 HM  

Economics

  
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    ECON053 HM - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: An introductory course designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the national economy. Topics include theories of unemployment, growth, inflation, income distribution, consumption, savings, investment, and finance markets, and the historical evolution of economic institutions and macroeconomic ideas.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON054 HM - Principles of Microeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sullivan

    Description: Provides methods of investigating the individual behavior of people, businesses, and governments in a market environment. Topics include elementary models of human economic behavior and resource allocation, and the evolution of market institutions and their impact upon society.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON103 HM - The Great Economists


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: This course surveys the significant contributions of a noted economist.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON140 HM - Economics of Gender, Work, and Family


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sullivan

    Description: An introduction to research and theory in the rapidly growing field of work and family studies. Inherently interdisciplinary, the study of work/family intersections involves the literatures of sociology, anthropology, psychology, legal studies, and history, as well as economics. Topics to be considered include: the relationship between parental work and child development; the economic effects of care-giver status; gender differentials in the workplace; family-related public policy; the division of household labor, and work and health. Taught in seminar style and largely discussion-based.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics; Gender Studies
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON142 HM - Development Economics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sullivan

    Description: A critical introduction to the major orthodox and heterodox theories of development economics and to a selection of alternative strategies. Central objectives include identification of the determinants of economic growth and the distinction of growth from development.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON150 HM - Political Economy of Higher Education


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Sullivan

    Description: An exploration of topics central to the political economy of contemporary American higher education. Organized as a seminar, the course is also a workshop in which students develop reading lists, influence the selection of subtopics, and lead discussions. Likely topics include the academic labor market, admissions and marketing issues, college sports, and the role of government funding. Particular attention will be paid to forces that shape the education of scientists, mathematicians, and engineers.

    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: Yes
  
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    ECON153 HM - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: A reexamination of the principles of macroeconomics at a more advanced level. The use of formal models for macroeconomic analysis and application to topical problems.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON053 HM ECON054 HM  is recommended
    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
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    ECON154 HM - Intermediate Microeconomics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: An advanced treatment of micro-economic theory using formal mathematical models for analysis. Optimization models of human behavior and resource use in a market environment are developed, analyzed, and applied to a topical economic allocation problem.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON054 HM  
    HSA Course Area(s): Economics
    HSA Writing Intensive: No

Education

  
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    EDUC170G CG - Introduction to Public School Teaching


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: This course examines the foundations of teaching and learning in public schools from various perspectives. These include, but are not limited to, philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, politics and economics. A primary aim of this course is to explore habitually unexamined attitudes and assumptions that bear on teaching practices in public schools. Another goal is to ground our readings and discussions in the realities of contemporary public school classrooms. The course requirements include 9 hours of public classroom observation.

    Students interested in pre-college teaching should contact the Teacher Education Program at CGU to arrange for courses that will meet the requirements for a teaching credential in California.


Engineering

  
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    ENGR004 HM - Introduction to Engineering Design and Manufacturing


    Credit(s): 4

    Instructor(s): Mendelson, Santana

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Design problems are, typically, open-ended and ill-structured. Students work in small teams applying techniques for solving design problems that are, normally, posed by not-for-profit clients. The project work is enhanced with lectures and reading on design theory and methods, and introduction to manufacturing techniques, project management techniques and engineering ethics. Enrollment limited to first-year students and sophomores, or by permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): WRIT001 HM  
    Corequisite(s): PHYS024 HM  
  
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    ENGR072 HM - Engineering Mathematics


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Instructor(s): Bassman, Lape, Yong (Mathematics)

    Offered: Spring, first half

    Description: Applications of differential equations, linear algebra, and probability to engineering problems in multiple disciplines. Mathematical modeling, dimen­sional analysis, scale, approximation, model validation, Laplace Transforms.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH019 HM MATH073 HM MATH082 HM , and ENGR079 HM  
  
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    ENGR079 HM - Introduction to Engineering Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall

    Description: An introduction to the concepts of modern engineering, emphasizing modeling, analysis, synthesis, and design. Applications to chemical, mechanical, and electrical systems.

    A course materials fee, payable to the HMC Department of Engineering, applies. No textbook purchase required.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS024 HM  
    Corequisite(s): MATH082 HM  

  
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    ENGR080 HM - Experimental Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the basic techniques of instrumentation and measurement in both the laboratory and in engineering field measure­ments. Emphasis on experimental problem solving in real systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR079 HM  
    Corequisite(s): ENGR072 HM  
  
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    ENGR082 HM - Chemical and Thermal Processes


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Lape, Spjut

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: The basic elements of thermal and chemical processes, including: state variables, open and closed systems, and mass balance; energy balance, First Law of Thermodynamics for reactive and non-reactive systems; entropy balance, Second Law of Thermodynamics, thermodynamic cycles, and efficiency.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM023A HM  and CHEM023B HM  
  
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    ENGR083 HM - Continuum Mechanics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bassman

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: The fundamentals of modeling continuous media, including: stress, strain and constitutive relations; elements of tensor analysis; basic applications of solid and fluid mechanics (including beam theory, torsion, statically indeterminate problems, and Bernoulli’s principle); application of conservation laws to control volumes.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR079 HM  and PHYS024 HM  
  
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    ENGR084 HM - Electronic and Magnetic Circuits and Devices


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Wang, Yang

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Introduction to the fundamental principles underlying electronic devices and applications of these devices in circuits. Topics include electrical properties of materials; physical electronics (with emphasis on semiconductors and semiconductor devices); passive linear electrical and magnetic circuits; active linear circuits (including elementary transistor amplifiers and the impact of non-ideal characteristics of operational amplifiers on circuit behavior); operating point linearization and load-line analysis; electromagnetic devices such as transformers.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR079 HM  
  
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    ENGR085 HM - Digital Electronics and Computer Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Harris

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: This course provides an introduction to elements of digital electronics, followed by an introduction to digital computers. Topics in digital electronics include: Boolean algebra; combinational logic; sequential logic; finite state machines; transistor-level implementations; computer arithmetic; and transmission lines. The computer engineering portion of the course includes computer architecture and micro-architecture: levels of abstraction; assembly-language programming; and memory systems. The digital electronics portion of Engineering 85 may be taken by non-engineering majors as a stand-alone half course under the number ENGR085A HM .

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI005 HM  or CSCI005GR HM  or CSCI042 HM  
  
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    ENGR085A HM - Digital Electronics


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Instructor(s): Harris

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: This course provides an introduction to elements of digital electronics, intended for non-engineering majors who may be interested in pursuing other advanced engineering courses that require this background. Lectures for this course coincide with lectures for the first half of ENGR085 HM .

    Prerequisite(s): CSCI005 HM  or CSCI005GR HM  or CSCI042 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR086 HM - Materials Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Dato, Krauss, Spjut

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Introduction to the structure, properties, and processing of materials used in engineering applications. Topics include: material structure (bonding, crystalline and non-crystalline structures, imperfections); equilibrium microstructures; diffusion, nucleation, growth, kinetics, non-equilibrium processing; microstructure, properties and processing of: steel, ceramics, polymers and composites; creep and yield; fracture mechanics; and the selec­tion of materials and appropriate performance indices.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM023A HM CHEM023B HM , MATH019 HM MATH073 HM , and PHYS024 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR091 HM - Intermediate Problems in Engineering


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: Independent study in a field agreed upon by student and instructor. Credit hours to be arranged.

  
  •  

    ENGR101 HM - Advanced Systems Engineering I


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Cha, Clark, Durón, Wang, Yang

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Analysis and design of continuous-time and discrete-time systems using time domain and frequency domain techniques. The first semester focuses on the connections and distinctions between continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems and their representation in the time and frequency domains. Topics include impulse response, convolution, continuous and discrete Fourier series and transforms, and frequency response. Current applications, including filtering, modulation and sampling, are presented, and simula­tion techniques based on both time and frequency domain representations are introduced. In the second semester additional analysis and design tools based on the Laplace- and z-transforms are developed, and the state space formulation of continuous and discrete-time systems is presented. Concepts covered during both semesters are applied in a comprehensive treatment of feedback control systems including performance criteria, stability, observability, controllability, compensa­tion and pole placement.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR072 HM ENGR079 HM , and ENGR080 HM   
  
  •  

    ENGR102 HM - Advanced Systems Engineering II


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Cha, Clark, Durón, Wang, Yang

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Analysis and design of continuous-time and discrete-time systems using time domain and frequency domain techniques. The first semester focuses on the connections and distinctions between continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems and their representation in the time and frequency domains. Topics include impulse response, convolution, continuous and discrete Fourier series and transforms, and frequency response. Current applications, including filtering, modulation and sampling, are presented, and simula­tion techniques based on both time and frequency domain representations are introduced. In the second semester additional analysis and design tools based on the Laplace- and z-transforms are developed, and the state space formulation of continuous and discrete-time systems is presented. Concepts covered during both semesters are applied in a comprehensive treatment of feedback control systems including performance criteria, stability, observability, controllability, compensa­tion and pole placement.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR101 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR111 HM - Engineering Clinic I


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Gokli, staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Participation in engineering projects through the Engineering Clinic. Emphasis is on design of solutions for real problems, involving problem definition, synthesis of concepts, analysis, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in engineering or permission of Clinic director
    Concurrent Requisite(s): ENGR122 HM  

  
  •  

    ENGR112 HM - Engineering Clinic II


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Gokli, staff

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Participation in engineering projects through the Engineering Clinic. Emphasis is on design of solutions for real problems, involving problem definition, synthesis of concepts, analysis, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM , ENGR080 HM , and ENGR111 HM  or permission of Clinic director
  
  •  

    ENGR113 HM - Engineering Clinic III


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Gokli, staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Participation in engineering projects through the Engineering Clinic. Emphasis is on design of solutions for real problems, involving problem definition, synthesis of concepts, analysis, and evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM , ENGR080 HM , and ENGR111 HM  or permission of Clinic director
  
  •  

    ENGR114 HM - Engineering Clinic


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Harris, staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: A continuation of Engineering Clinic for juniors who elect a second semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Clinic director
  
  •  

    ENGR122 HM - Engineering Seminar


    Credit(s): 0.5

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Fall and Spring

    Description: Weekly meetings devoted to discussion of engineering practice. Required of junior engineering majors. No more than 2.0 credits can be earned for departmental seminars/col­loquia. 

    Grading Type: Pass/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s): Juniors only
  
  •  

    ENGR124 HM - Engineering Seminar


    Credit(s): 0.5

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Weekly meetings devoted to the discussion of engineering practice. Required of senior engineering majors. No more than 2.0 credits can be earned for departmental seminars/col­loquia. 

    Grading Type: Pass/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s): Seniors only
  
  •  

    ENGR131 HM - Fluid Mechanics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Lape

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Integrated approach to the subjects of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer through the study of the governing equations common to all three fields. Applications drawn from a wide variety of engineering systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR083 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR133 HM - Chemical Reaction Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Spjut

    Offered: Fall, alternate years

    Description: The fundamentals of chemical reactor engineering: chemical reaction kinetics, interpretation of experimental rate data, design of batch and continuous reactors for single and multiple reactions including temperature and pressure effects, and the importance of safety considerations in reactor design.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR082 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR134 HM - Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Lape, Spjut

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: The application of classical thermodynamics to engineering systems. Topics include power and refrigeration cycles, energy and process efficiency, real gases and non-ideal phase, and chemical reaction equilibria.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR082 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR138 HM - Introduction to Environmental Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: Introduction to the main concepts and applications in modern environmental engineering. Included are surface and groundwater pollution (both classical pollutants and toxic substances); risk assessment and analysis; air pollution; and global atmospheric change.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR082 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR147 HM - Material Science of Energy Conversion and Storage


    Credit(s): 2

    Instructor(s): Saeta (Physics), Van Ryswyk (Chemistry)

    Description: Materials science of energy conversion and storage, dealing with photovoltaics, fuel cells, batteries, thermoelectrics, and other devices. Seminar format. (Crosslisted as CHEM192 HM  and PHYS147 HM )

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM052 HM  or PHYS052 HM  or ENGR086 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR151 HM - Analog Circuit Design


    Credit(s): 4

    Instructor(s): Spencer

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Design and analysis of electronic circuits based on semiconductor devices (e.g. pn diode, MOSFET, BJT), particularly linear amplifiers including operational amplifiers and associated building blocks. Includes a laboratory focused on experimental realization and measurement of electronic devices and circuits.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR079 HM  and ENGR084 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR155 HM - Microprocessor-Based Systems: Design and Applications


    Credit(s): 4

    Instructor(s): Harris

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Introduction to digital design using programmable logic and microprocessors. Combinational and sequential logic. Finite state machines. Hardware description languages. Field programmable gate arrays. Microcontrollers and embedded system design. Students gain experience with complex digital system design, embedded programming, and hardware/software trade-offs through significant laboratory and project work.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR085 HM  or (ENGR085A HM  and CSCI060 HM )
  
  •  

    ENGR157 HM - Radio Frequency Circuit Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Spencer

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Design and analysis of high speed communication circuits with an emphasis on microwave design, measurement techniques, and wireless communication links.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR084 HM  
    Corequisite(s): ENGR101 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR161 HM - Computer Image Processing and Analysis


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Wang

    Offered: Fall, alternate years

    Description: An introduction to both image processing, including acquisition, enhancement and res­toration; and image analysis, including representation, classification and recognition. Discussion on related subjects such as unitary transforms, and statistical and neural network pattern recognition methods. Project oriented.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR101 HM  and programming proficiency
  
  •  

    ENGR164 HM - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: The application of engineering principles to help pose and solve problems in medicine and biology. Focus on different aspects, particularly biomedical measurements, biosystems analysis, biomechanics, and biomaterials.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL052 HM ENGR079 HM , and junior standing. 
  
  •  

    ENGR168 HM - Introduction to Fiber Optic Communication Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Yang

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: This course provides the fundamentals of optics and its applications in communication systems. The physical layer of optical communication systems will be emphasized. Topics include optical materials; dispersion and nonlinear effects; polarization and interference; and the basic elements of system implementation such as laser sources, optical amplifiers, and optical detectors. The course will include a multiple channel system design.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR079 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR171 HM - Dynamics of Elastic Systems


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Cha, Durón

    Offered: Fall

    Description: Free and forced response of single-degree-of-freedom systems. Eigenvalue problem for multi-degree-of-freedom systems; natural modes of free vibration. Forced response of un­damped and viscously damped, multi-degree-of-freedom systems by modal analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR083 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR172 HM - Structural Mechanics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bassman, Cha

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Introduction to elementary structural systems: trusses, beams. Force and deflection analysis. Energy methods. Stability. Introduction to finite element methods.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR083 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR175 HM - Dynamics of Rigid Bodies


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Bassman

    Description: Kinematics, mass distribution, and kinetics of systems of particles and rigid bodies. Formulation of equations of motion with: Newton/Euler equations; angular momentum prin­ciple; power, work and energy methods. Numerical solutions of nonlinear algebraic and ordinary differential equations governing the behavior of multiple degree of freedom systems. Computer simulation of multi-body dynamic systems. Construction of physical systems for comparison with simulation.

    Corequisite(s): ENGR083 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR176 HM - Numerical Methods in Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Cha, Wang

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: This course focuses on the application of a variety of mathematical techniques to solve real-world problems that involve modeling, mathematical and numerical analysis, and scientific computing. Concepts, calculations and the ability to apply principles to physical prob­lems are emphasized. Ordinary differential equations, linear algebra, complex analysis, numerical methods, partial differential equations, probability and statistics, etc., are among the techniques that would be applied to problems in mechanical, electrical, chemical and civil engineering. Examples are drawn from fluid mechanics, heat transfer, vibration of structures, electromagnet­ics, communications and other applied topics. Program development and modification are expected as well as learning to use existing code.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR072 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR178 HM - High Power Rocketry


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Spjut

    Offered: Spring

    Description: This course uses high power rockets as a vehicle for learning and demonstrating competence in modeling, experimental data collection and data analysis of rigid body and flight dynamics. In particular, students will perform 1-D analytical and numerical characterization of flight data including motor performance, testing and characterization of avionics and telemetry, develop and use models for inertial navigation and sensor fusion, and characterize structural dynamics during flight. The final project will demonstrate all of the above from data the students collect during flights of the rockets the students will construct and instrument, designed to reach Mach 1.6 and an altitude of 13,000 ft.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR080 HM  for Engineering majors or the combination of ENGR079 HM  and permission of instructor for non-majors with the appropriate background.
    Corequisite(s): Corequisites: TRA or NAR Level 1 certification. Level 2 certification strongly recommended.
  
  •  

    ENGR180 HM - Human Centered Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Leichter

    Description: This course introduces students to human-centered design approaches for innovative problem solving. Human-centered design begins with a deep understanding of people and social contexts. The course will include fundamental readings in design thinking, interactive design methods and processes, and hands-on projects. Students will learn how user research, synthesis, idea generation, and prototyping can be integrated into different phases of the design process. 

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR181 HM - New Product Development


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Krauss

    Description: This course will introduce the theory and practice of a process used for new product development that considers design, management and manufacturing components. Students will identify needs (market or humanitarian) amenable to an engineered product solution, select and scope the project need they will address, quantify the impact of a solution through a business case, design and develop multiple prototype solutions, validate the resulting product and solicit funding for a launch.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and ENGR004 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR182 HM - Manufacturing Planning and Execution


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Gokli

    Offered: Spring

    Description: This course provides a fundamental understanding of manufacturing and its systems through industrial, manufacturing, and quality engineering disciplines. The course teaches three main learning modules: operations, quality, and supply chain. After designing and prototyping, students will learn how to mass-produce a product at minimum cost, highest quality, and in the fastest & most efficient manner. The course introduces students to the vocabulary, processes, and tools of manufacturing with hands-on experience.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR183 HM - Management of Technical Enterprise


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Gokli, Krauss

    Offered: Fall

    Description: This course provides a fundamental understanding of management practices in a technical enterprise. Instructors teach three main learning modules: financial management, people management and company management. Students will learn processes, tools, organiza­tion and measurables in all three learning modules.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM  and Junior standing. 
  
  •  

    ENGR185A HM - Engineering Design and Invention


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Instructor(s): Furuya

    Offered: Fall, second half; Spring, first half

    Description: Develop a creative and innovative mindset, “thinking differently” to generate novel and patentable design ideas. Final presentation to industry panelists.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR004 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR185B HM - Engineering Design and Invention II


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Instructor(s): Furuya

    Offered: Spring first and second halves

    Description: Continuation of work begun in ENGR185A HM , including the completion of the prototype developed in the prior half-semester.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR185A HM  and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGR187 HM - Operations Research


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Benjamin (Mathematics), Martonosi (Mathematics)

    Description: Linear, integer, non-linear and dynamic programming, classical optimization problems, and network theory. (Crosslisted as MATH187 HM )

    Prerequisite(s): MATH073 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR190 HM - Special Topics in Engineering


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: An upper division or graduate technical elective treating topics in engineering not covered in other courses, chosen at the discretion of the engineering department.

  
  •  

    ENGR191 HM - Advanced Problems in Engineering


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: Independent study in a field agreed upon by student and instructor. Credit hours to be arranged.

  
  •  

    ENGR205 HM - State Estimation


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Clark

    Offered: Fall

    Description: This course explores the field of state estimation, and does so through applications in autonomous vehicles. Topics include a review of probability, state or belief representations, and an introduction to several popular filters including Bayes Filters, Kalman Filters, Extended Kalman Filters, Unscented Kalman Filters, and Particle Filters. The course will include a series of labs where students apply the different filters to real data. The course will culminate in a self-designed project in which students must find or collect their own data.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR101 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR206 HM - Optimization Techniques in Engineering Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring

    Description: Presentation of techniques for making optimum choices among alternatives; applications to engineering design problems.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR101 HM  and ENGR102 HM   
  
  •  

    ENGR240 HM - Introduction to Compressible Flow


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: The effects of compressibility in the governing integral and differential equations for fluids. The effects of friction, heating and shock waves in steady one-dimensional flow. Unsteady wave motion and the method of characteristics. Two-dimensional flow over air foils, linearized potential flow and the method of characteristics for supersonic flow.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR131 HM  
  
  •  

    ENGR278 HM - Advanced Structural Dynamics


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Cha

    Offered: Spring, alternate years

    Description: Free and forced response of continuous systems, including the vibration of strings, rods, shafts, membranes, beams, and plates. One dimensional finite element methods: discretization of a continuum, selection of interpolation functions, and determining the element mass and stiffness matrices and the corresponding load vector. Introduction to special topics, including the effects of parameter uncertainties on the dynamics of periodic structures and model updating in structural dynamics.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGR171 HM  

Environmental Analysis

  
  •  

    EA010 HM - Introduction to Environmental Analysis


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Staff

    Description: This course examines the history of environmental change, the environmental ramifications of economic and technological decisions, the impact of personal choices, and the need to evaluate environmental arguments critically. We will delve into questions such as: What is nature? How have ideas about nature varied across time and across different cultures? How have those ideas about nature influenced interactions with environments? Why doesn’t everyone have access to a clean and safe environment?

    HSA Course Area(s): Environmental Analysis
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
  
  •  

    EA174 HM - Building Los Angeles


    Credit(s): 3

    Instructor(s): Groves

    Description: This course explores the complex network of urban communities in which we live in order that we might think more deeply about the relationship of the built to the natural environment. To complicate our conceptions of Los Angeles, we consider the city’s history and infrastructure and examine the social stresses and environmental pressures that result from planning decisions. We also focus on Southern California architecture and design as a profound expression of the relationship between the built and the natural, including new urbanism and the maturation of green design. As a required experiential component, the course features a substantial number of Saturday field trips. $50 fee to cover transportation costs.

    HSA Course Area(s): Environmental Analysis
    HSA Writing Intensive: No
 

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